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myvintagevogue:

Donna Reed 1945 photo by Clarence Sinclair Bull

myvintagevogue:

Donna Reed 1945 photo by Clarence Sinclair Bull



maudelynn:

Hedy Lamarr, at home,  c.1941

maudelynn:

Hedy Lamarr, at home,  c.1941




Jayne Mansfield, C.1950’s

Jayne Mansfield, C.1950’s



valentinovamp:

Gene Tierney in a wardrobe test for “Tobacco Road" (1940)

valentinovamp:

Gene Tierney in a wardrobe test for “Tobacco Road" (1940)



maudelynn:

Betty Compson and her Best Friend ~ c.1930 
via ebay.com

maudelynn:

Betty Compson and her Best Friend ~ c.1930 

via ebay.com






Veronica Lake, 1943

Veronica Lake, 1943




Arlene Francis

Arlene Francis




Rita Hayworth lighting Victor Mature’s cigarette, 1942

Rita Hayworth lighting Victor Mature’s cigarette, 1942




Debbie Harry photographed by Chris Stein.

Debbie Harry photographed by Chris Stein.



johnhannahs:

Janet Gaynor, 1930’s

johnhannahs:

Janet Gaynor, 1930’s




Coca-Cola advertisement, 1966

Coca-Cola advertisement, 1966



rustons:


The dilemma for Anna May Wong was increasingly obvious. Despite her triumph in The Thief of Bagdad and continued good reviews in mediocre productions, her career was stalled in Hollywood. True, she was now a staple in movie magazines, with full-page spreads appearing regularly. But her chances of moving up from supporting or featured player to star were improbable. Production codes against interracial kissing meant that she could not graduate to star billing, even in films with Orientalist themes. Rather, she had to watch as less talented white women took the roles that might have given her more fame, and at least more sympathetic parts. Despite her great beauty, she was cast as a prostitute, an opium dealer, or simply as insignificant color. Her final scenes featured suicide by knife or death by overdose of opium.

Anna May Wong: From Laundryman’s Daughter to Hollywood Legend (Graham Russell Gao Hodges)

rustons:

The dilemma for Anna May Wong was increasingly obvious. Despite her triumph in The Thief of Bagdad and continued good reviews in mediocre productions, her career was stalled in Hollywood. True, she was now a staple in movie magazines, with full-page spreads appearing regularly. But her chances of moving up from supporting or featured player to star were improbable. Production codes against interracial kissing meant that she could not graduate to star billing, even in films with Orientalist themes. Rather, she had to watch as less talented white women took the roles that might have given her more fame, and at least more sympathetic parts. Despite her great beauty, she was cast as a prostitute, an opium dealer, or simply as insignificant color. Her final scenes featured suicide by knife or death by overdose of opium.

Anna May Wong: From Laundryman’s Daughter to Hollywood Legend (Graham Russell Gao Hodges)