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lapitiedangereuse:

Barbara Stanwyck

lapitiedangereuse:

Barbara Stanwyck



mariedeflor:

"My father loved my mother madly and when she died, he went gypsy. I was raised by strangers, farmed out. There were no rules or regulations. Whoever would take me for five dollars a week, that’s where I was. So I really didn’t have any family."      She learned to live on the streets and to make the best of it. "We never played games, I never cared for games anyway. The only game I can remember playing is the game of fighting." She learned at a young age that her survival was based on self-preservation.     She was the leader of any gang she and her brother played with. Despite her quietness, the other children would turn to her when they were hurt or bullied. She never failed them. 

mariedeflor:

"My father loved my mother madly and when she died, he went gypsy. I was raised by strangers, farmed out. There were no rules or regulations. Whoever would take me for five dollars a week, that’s where I was. So I really didn’t have any family." 
     She learned to live on the streets and to make the best of it. "We never played games, I never cared for games anyway. The only game I can remember playing is the game of fighting." She learned at a young age that her survival was based on self-preservation.
     She was the leader of any gang she and her brother played with. Despite her quietness, the other children would turn to her when they were hurt or bullied. She never failed them. 



mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck photographed on the set of Ball of Fire, 1941

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck photographed on the set of Ball of Fire, 1941



mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor at the races, 1939

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor at the races, 1939



mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck photographed playing tennis, 1938

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck photographed playing tennis, 1938



mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor photographed after leaving their handprints at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre June 11, 1941

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor photographed after leaving their handprints at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre June 11, 1941



mariedeflor:

Natalie Wood and Barbara Stanwyck on the set of The Bride Wore Boots, 1946

mariedeflor:

Natalie Wood and Barbara Stanwyck on the set of The Bride Wore Boots, 1946



mariedeflor:

A rare 1940s candid of Barbara Stanwyck 

mariedeflor:

A rare 1940s candid of Barbara Stanwyck 



fuckyesoldhollywood:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor (awwww)
Not sure where they are in this photo…

fuckyesoldhollywood:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor (awwww)

Not sure where they are in this photo…


mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck, 1946Original caption: The sun basking beauty is Warner Bros. star Barbara Stanwyck -- "Stany" to her friends. Miss Stanwyck, starred in "My Reputation," is shown relaxing at home during a brief respite from picture making.

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck, 1946
Original caption: The sun basking beauty is Warner Bros. star Barbara Stanwyck -- "Stany" to her friends. Miss Stanwyck, starred in "My Reputation," is shown relaxing at home during a brief respite from picture making.



mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor peek at gift packages on the liner Queen Elizabeth February 4, 1947

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor peek at gift packages on the liner Queen Elizabeth February 4, 1947



fuckyesoldhollywood:

Missy how so beautiful?!

fuckyesoldhollywood:

Missy how so beautiful?!



mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck photographed in a sweater with her nickname “Missy” on it. Well, I have a negro maid (Harriett Coray), she’s been with me 30 years, and she’s not a maid she’s a friend. When she first came to work for me in 1938 or 9 she started calling me Missy, and the crews gradually picked it up and so did my family. I like it very much because she gave it to me - and I love her. - Barbara Stanwyck 

mariedeflor:

Barbara Stanwyck photographed in a sweater with her nickname “Missy” on it. 
Well, I have a negro maid (Harriett Coray), she’s been with me 30 years, and she’s not a maid she’s a friend. When she first came to work for me in 1938 or 9 she started calling me Missy, and the crews gradually picked it up and so did my family. I like it very much because she gave it to me - and I love her. 
- Barbara Stanwyck